Intervention

Intervention can bring about about transformation. Along with a growing number of North American cities, Hamilton brings its community-builders together on a single day for a project icalled “100-in-1-day” and, in our city, it has comprised more than 120 interventions involving thousands of engaged citizens. Hamiltonians take pride its diverse people coming together to make a difference for the greater good. That does not mean it’s easy.

How often have you heard “It can’t be done” or “We don’t do it that way” or “Why can’t they just do what I say?” If you are smiling or nodding your head, you know what I mean. Sometimes we cause ourselves stress, angst, and great frustration because we keep doing that same thing over and over again expecting different results. Sometimes we become closed-minded, set in our ways. A few years ago I came across a poem that illustrates this point: “Autobiography in Five Short Chapters” by Portia Nelson from her book, There’s a Hole in My Sidewalk.

Chapter One I walk down the street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I fall in. I am lost . . . I am helpless. It isn’t my fault . . . It takes forever to find a way out.
Chapter Two I walk down the same street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I pretend I don’t see it. I fall in again. I can’t believe I am in this same place. But it isn’t my fault. It still takes a long time to get out.
Chapter Three I walk down the same street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I see it there. I still fall . . . it’s a habit . . . but, My eyes are open. I know where I am. It is my fault. I get out immediately.
Chapter Four I walk down the same street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I walk around it.
Chapter Five I walk down another street.

Looking to the future in your community, how can you, as an individual, open your heart and spirit to new ways of thinking and, in turn, new ways of being? Let’s start by cultivating a creative mind. Keep a notebook handy and write down your thoughts about future projects you would like to do for yourself and your community. Do not judge them—just get them on paper. You will be surprised at how creative you are.

Get involved in your community. Share your ideas because it could be that others have similar ones.

We are blessed to live in this place called Crown Point. We have community leaders, neighbours, and businesses that are willing and excited to work with us. They don’t say “It can’t be done”. They say “Let’s work together to make it happen.”

May we continue to work together and enjoy all that we do.